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Despite double-digit growth, Italy’s live music industry asks for Culture ministry support

 

04/02/16

Audiences for live music in Italy continue to grow, both in terms of spectators (+12%) as well as the revenue (+17.7%). The sector is healthy, in 2015 it generated €260.5 million.

Those who predicted a collapse in the number of concert goers following the Paris terrorist attacks on November 13 turned out to be wrong. According to the data released by Assomusica, the association of live music shows producers and organizers based on figures from SIAE, 2015 closed with 6.9 million concert goers, 12% more than were recorded in the previous year. There were 3,965 events organized, up by 8.2%, testifying that the existence of a strong demand drives supply.

However, the true boom is that of proceeds, which reached €260.5 million (+17.7%).

The most important segment is, as usual, pop music which is worth €227.8 million, recording an increase of 28.6%, while jazz continues to represent a very lively niche (collecting €2.5 million, +10.4%).

The big players as well as the 11,000 SMEs in the sector together employ around 400,000 people.

In October, Minister of Culture Dario Franceschini announced measures to support the segment, garnering industry operators' support.

The problem, as underlined by Assomusica president Vincenzo Spera in a letter to Minister Franceschini, is that “the live music performance sector is not even mentioned among the areas of focus for the exercise of the mandate (only theater, prose, dance, showmen, and circus activities).”

Lyric-symphonic music continues to be dominant in terms of state funding, and Spera does not approve.

“We are a segment,” he said, “that innovates, is increasingly international and gives employment opportunities to young people. For years we have been waiting for a reform law framework: the current legislation is old and it does not take into account the changes in the last 40 years.”

A loud protest is looming.


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Fonte: Il Sole 24 Ore

Francesco Prisco